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Introducing The New Dynon D1 Pocket Panel (Read 9610 times)
Jul 22nd, 2012 at 9:26pm

DFlyer   Offline
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Introducing the new D1 Pocket Panel, a Dynon true attitude instrument that can be used by ALL pilots!

The product announcement is here:
http://www.dynonavionics.com/docs/news_version_D1_23July2012.html

And you can download the D1 product brochure here:
http://www.dynonavionics.com/downloads/Literature/Dynon-D1-Pocket-Panel-Web-Jul2...
 
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Reply #1 - Jul 23rd, 2012 at 10:32pm

Bob_Redman   Offline
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Congratulations.   Looks good.

Can it feed GPS data to the DSAB for a D100/D120/AP74 to generate TAS, winds ? I use manual HDG set for VFR navigation with the autopilot, not GPS NAV .

Regards,

Bob Redman
 
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Reply #2 - Jul 24th, 2012 at 5:48am

Dynon Support   Offline
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This device has no outputs, so it cannot feed the D100 GPS data.
 

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Reply #3 - Jul 24th, 2012 at 1:40pm

GalinHdz   Offline
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How does it find it's initial attitude? Does it have to be powered up while the airplane is straight and level?  Cool
« Last Edit: Jul 24th, 2012 at 1:41pm by GalinHdz »  

N819PR
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Reply #4 - Jul 24th, 2012 at 4:27pm

Dynon Support   Offline
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The attitude algorithm requires a GPS lock, which at times may take a few moments at flying speed, and then there's the roll and pitch alignment mode to correct for any physical misalignment with the aircraft if you've moved it since last use. Beyond that, though, the aircraft doesn't strictly need to be straight and level when it's powered up - it will work out the attitude as long as it has GPS and is flown straight and level for a few seconds at some point. But the primary idea is that you get it mounted and aligned before you take off.
« Last Edit: Jul 24th, 2012 at 4:28pm by Dynon Support »  

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Reply #5 - Jul 31st, 2012 at 1:08pm

Extra Driver   Offline
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What is the refresh rate? Will it handle aerobatics?
 
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Reply #6 - Jul 31st, 2012 at 4:05pm

Dynon Support   Offline
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The screen's "Refresh rate" isn't the limitation for aerobatics - rotation rate about any axis is. If you exceed 150 deg/sec (which is pretty fast), you'll exceed the D1's capability to show a determined attitude. When this happens, it will show a "horizon recovering message". Once you're back to straight and level for a few seconds, it will reorient itself without any button pushing required and carry on. Basically, it's not meant to be a primary attitude indicator while doing aerobatics (your eyes outside are), but it won't cause any issues or damage to the D1 either outside of an incorrect attitude indication while you're tumbling the airplane around the sky.
« Last Edit: Jul 31st, 2012 at 4:18pm by Dynon Support »  

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Reply #7 - Aug 1st, 2012 at 5:43am

Charles Reiche   Offline
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Dynon Support wrote on Jul 24th, 2012 at 4:27pm:
The attitude algorithm requires a GPS lock, which at times may take a few moments at flying speed, and then there's the roll and pitch alignment mode to correct for any physical misalignment with the aircraft if you've moved it since last use. Beyond that, though, the aircraft doesn't strictly need to be straight and level when it's powered up - it will work out the attitude as long as it has GPS and is flown straight and level for a few seconds at some point. But the primary idea is that you get it mounted and aligned before you take off.



So this would be a good solution for older Cirrus aircraft mounted slightly canted forward on the lower bolster panel, rather than cutting a hole to add an attitude indicator?
 
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Reply #8 - Aug 1st, 2012 at 7:05am

dabear   Offline
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You can mount it to the pannel even if it has a cant forward or back.  THen adjust the unit so that its correct for the airplane.   It will then use that as its initial reference.


Bear
 

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Intercom, Radio, Transponder, ADS-B, Dynon D1
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Reply #9 - Aug 1st, 2012 at 4:48pm

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Yep - exactly what it's meant for. Just remember that it's not a certified device, so it's supplemental only, like a portable GPS. It can't replace or take the place of any required instrument.
 

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Reply #10 - Aug 14th, 2012 at 2:10pm

Bennett   Offline
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I mounted my D1 with the suction mount just above the left side of the glare-shield. While it should be easy to read In this position, bright sunlight washes out the screen (even with brightness turned full high). If I cup my hands around the unit, I can see it better, so I suggest that Dynon produce and sell a glare shield - nothing very fancy, and it can be held in place by the regular mount clips.
« Last Edit: Aug 14th, 2012 at 2:11pm by Bennett »  

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Reply #11 - Sep 18th, 2012 at 10:28am

Cary   Offline
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I notice that the specs include a USB port for power in.  Is this the standard 5v USB port?  I have a USB 5v outlet in addition to 3 12v outlets, but 2 of the 12v outlets are in use and I like to leave the 3rd one open for passengers to plug in their laptops.  If the Pocket Panel can be powered from the USB 5v outlet, that would be ideal for me.  Thanks.
 
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Reply #12 - Sep 18th, 2012 at 10:46am

Dynon Support   Offline
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Cary wrote on Sep 18th, 2012 at 10:28am:
I notice that the specs include a USB port for power in.  Is this the standard 5v USB port?  I have a USB 5v outlet in addition to 3 12v outlets, but 2 of the 12v outlets are in use and I like to leave the 3rd one open for passengers to plug in their laptops.  If the Pocket Panel can be powered from the USB 5v outlet, that would be ideal for me.  Thanks.


Yes, the D1 can be powered externally by a USB port / USB power outlet. This is discussed in the D1 Pilot's User Guide, Page 4-6: Mini-USB: Can be used to charge unit from any USB power source (USB cable not provided).
 

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Reply #13 - Sep 22nd, 2012 at 7:32pm

thammer   Offline
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Dynon Support wrote on Jul 24th, 2012 at 4:27pm:
The attitude algorithm requires a GPS lock,
which at times may take a few moments at flying speed, and then there's the roll and pitch alignment mode to correct for any physical misalignment with the aircraft if you've moved it since last use. Beyond that, though, the aircraft doesn't strictly need to be straight and level when it's powered up - it will work out the attitude as long as it has GPS and is flown straight and level for a few seconds at some point. But the primary idea is that you get it mounted and aligned before you take off.


I was going to buy one until I found about about it needing a GPS lock for attitude. Makes it worthless as an emergency attitude indicator. I haven't flown behind a GPS yet that hasn't lost signal at some point in time. The last thing you want is an attitude indicator that needs a GPS signal.

 
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Reply #14 - Sep 23rd, 2012 at 6:43am

mmarien   Offline
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The GPS satellite signals are very weak so the receiver needs a clear view of the sky. If the GPS is mounted on the yoke in a metal aircraft it's bound to loose signal intermittently. Put your hand over it and watch the satellites drop out.

Mounted thoughtfully, it's a rare occurrence to loose GPS signal as there are enough satellites even if you don't have a complete view of the sky. There are 30 satellites so there should be an average of 15 satellites above the horizon at any given point. You only need four for a 3D fix.

On the other hand, a vacuum pump and the mechanical gauges attached to it are guaranteed to fail at some point.
 

Glasair II FT - o320 - P-Mags - EFII - MTV 3 Blade CS - VP-X - Single 10" Skyview - Stratux Dual Band - zooooom ...
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Reply #15 - Sep 24th, 2012 at 11:01am

thammer   Offline
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GPS signal is equally guaranteed to be lost at some time. Worse, guaranteed to be lost more often that the mechanical guages fail. I'd rather not be depending on an AI that needs a GPS lock.
 
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Reply #16 - Sep 24th, 2012 at 12:25pm

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There is no such thing as an affordable attitude indicator that works without some extended data. Many use magnetometers, but those don't work without careful installation and calibration. Some use pitot/static, which we also can't have access to in a portable device.

Many of the certified AHRS devices out there use GPS, most notably the AHRS in the Garmin G1000. It requires GPS for full performance. It has the benefit of having other sensors (pitot/static) if the GPS fails, but as mentioned we can't put those in a portable device.

Some AHRS units supposedly don't use anything, but they require minutes on the ground before you can fly with them, so they can't be quickly initialized in the air.

Ultimately, the use of GPS was the only reasonable way to give the world an affordable, portable AHRS that could be turned on in the plane if needed, and used as a backup. We use the latest GPS chipsets with excellent sensitivity, and they have performed admirably in our testing. No technology is perfect, but in our experience the use of GPS is very reliable, and the Dynon D1 is a product we very much believe in and think is safe and useful. We do make sure we are transparent about what requirements our products have to operate so that prospective customers can make informed decisions before purchasing.

Personally, if I'm in an airplane and my main attitude indicator fails, I'd much prefer to have a backup to that device which has a very, very good chance of working, versus no device at all.
« Last Edit: Sep 24th, 2012 at 12:27pm by Dynon Support »  

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Reply #17 - Sep 24th, 2012 at 4:29pm

Dynon Support   Offline
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One other thought:

Modern GPS receivers are amazing, including the one in the D1. They lock on quick, work even with moderate obstructions, and don't lose lock very often, especially in airplanes. The D1 can lock on in many hangars, for example. In fact, I'm staring at one that's on a desk a couple of feet from an office building window and it has a lock. And if you have one installed in a non-optimal place for seeing the sky, every D1 comes with a small wired GPS antenna that you can chuck up on the glareshield all the way forward. Practically speaking, the GPS reliance is a non-issue. It works basically all the time, and, in fact, should there be a momentary lapse, the D1 can deal with that without even letting you know. In the many hours of flight testing, losing GPS wasn't an issue, period.
 

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Reply #18 - Sep 24th, 2012 at 6:25pm

Ken Kopp   Offline
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not to mention your US Armed forces use GPS-assited AHRS (usually called an EGI). 

Good enough for combat..good enough for GA.
 
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